Question:
Condoms, a false hope?
robert f
2007-05-23 20:43:23 UTC
If the condom is put on correclty than it will protect you from getting STDs from vaginal intercourse. That is a big if. I have heard horror stories about condoms.

Would you use a condom because you do not know if your partner has any STDs or not? I would not.
Five answers:
2007-05-24 00:55:40 UTC
WITH A GLOVE, IT'S NOT LOVE



CONDOMS AS PROTECTION



Editor of Rubber Chemistry and Technology, Dr. C. Michael Roland of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington D.C., spoke about his research on "intrinsic flaws" in latex rubber condoms and surgical gloves (published in Rubber World, June, 1993).



Roland said that what I am about to relate is "common knowledge among good scientists who have no political agenda."



Electron microscopy reveals the HIV virus to be about O.1 microns in size (a micron is a millionth of a metre). It is 60 times smaller than a syphilis bacterium, and 450 times smaller than a single human sperm.



The standard U.S. government leakage test (ASTM) will detect water leakage through holes only as small as 10 to 12 microns (most condoms sold in Canada are made in the U.S.A., but I'll mention the Canadian test below). Roland says in good tests based on these standards, 33% of all condoms tested allowed HIV-sized particles through, and that "spermicidal agents such as nonoxonol-9 may actually ease the passage."



Roland's paper shows electron microscopy photos of natural latex. You can see the natural holes, or intrinsic flaws. The "inherent defects in natural rubber range between 5 and 70 microns."



And it's not as if governments don't know. A study by Dr. R.F. Carey of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reports that "leakage of HIV-sized particles through latex condoms was detectable for as many as 29 of 89 condoms tested." These were brand new, pre-approved condoms. But Roland

says a closer reading of Carey's data actually yields a 78% HIV-leakage rate, and concludes: "That the CDC would promote condoms based on [this] study...suggests its agenda is concerned with something other than public health and welfare." The federal government's standard tests, he adds,

"cannot detect flaws even 70 times larger than the AIDS virus." Such tests are "blind to leakage volumes less tha one microliter - yet this quantity of fluid from an AIDS-infected individual has been found to contain as many as 100,000 HIV particles."



As one U.S. surgeon memorably put it, "The HIV virus can go through a condom like a bullet through a tennis net."



It's the same story with latex gloves. Gloves from four different

manufacturers revealed "pits as large as 15 microns wide and 30 microns deep." More relevant to HIV transmission, "5 micron-wide channels, penetrating the entire thickness were found in all the gloves." He said the presence of such defects in latex "is well established."



For Canada, the story is the same. A standard Health and Welfare Canada test of condoms manufactured between 1987 and 1990, based on stringent tests of pressure, leakage, and volume (as in the U.S., there is no effort to examine micron-level leakage), reported that an astonishing 40% of the

condoms tested failed at least one of the tests. Tests in 1991 showed an "improved" 28% rate.



_________



The few statistics illustrating the effect of condoms use on HIV transmission in homosexual acts do not give clear cut results.

R.Detels (1989)lxxxix observed a 2.9% drop in seroconversion when condoms were used in homosexual intercourse, in a cohort of 2915 active homosexuals initally HIV sero-negative.



But, in that statistic, the number of partners for each member of the cohort was almost as important a factor as the use or not of a condom.



L.Levin et al. (1995)xc found that most (71%) of the 140 active-duty young men with documented sero-conversion who were identified in various US army installations did use a condom during their homosexual or heterosexual relations.



Results seemed to indicate a paradoxal increased risk of seroconversion proportional to condom use in this series.



CONDOMS AND CANCER



May 29, 2004



Potent Carcinogen found in Most Condoms



Recent study has discovered the presence of a very potent carcinogen in most condoms. Small amounts of this chemical are released whenever condoms are used.



Nobody knows whether this is serious yet however it is not likely to be healthy to expose the reproductive organs to cancer-causing substances on a regular basis.



This is a potentially serious issue for much of the world's population that cannot afford or access other forms of birth control. I hope further studies will follow on this soon. Could this be related to the rise in cancer in women, and men as well?

May 29, 2004 in Medicine | Permalink



http://novaspivack.typepad.com/nova_spivacks_weblog/2004/05/potent_carcinog.html



------------



Anal cancer is at least 20 times more common in homosexual men than in heterosexual men.



"Is Screening for Anal Cancer Warranted in Homosexual Men?"

Sexual Health (09.04) Vol. 1; No. 3: P. 137-140::Jonathan StC. Anderson; Claire Vajdic; Andrew E. Grulich



----------



Condom Talc danger is very serious



ALL CONDOMS ARE COATED WITH TALC TO PREVENT THEM STICKING TOGETHER



Talc



Talc is a very fine substance, so fine it can be used as a "dry" lubricant.



Talc is a chemical similar to asbestos, a known cancer causing substance. Talc is found in many "baby and body" powders, feminine powders and many cosmetics. It's alsp used as a lubricant on condoms! While it makes your skin "feel" slippery smooth, talc does so much more.



How does talc keep babies and your private parts so "fresh"? Presumably by clogging the pores that secrete those necessary fluids. Also, those fine little particles manage to get into the system. And being similar to asbestos is not comforting, especially when used on babies and genital areas.



Talc's harmful effect on human tissues has been known for quite some time. Long ago, its dry lubricating properties were used as a glove-donning powder (easy to slide on) for surgical gloves. As early as the 1930's, talc was linked to post-operative granulomatous peritonitis and fibrous adhesions.

-from Candace Sue Kasper, MD and Dr. P. J. Chandler



Talc...(on condoms)...may result in fallopian tube fibrosis with resultant infertility. Question raised by Doctors Kasper and Chandler in Journal of the American Medical Association. (JAMA) 3/15/95

-from Nutrition Health Review, Summer 1995 n73p8(1)



"A possible tie between talcum powder and ovarian cancer, long suspected because of talc's chemical similarity to asbestos, was strongly supported last week when a study found a higher risk of the cancer among women who used feminine deodorant sprays. The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that women who used talcum powder in the genital area had an increased ovarian cancer risk of 60% and women who used feminine deodorant sprays had a 90% increased risk." In 1994, the FDA conducted a scientific workshop on the issue and did not find enough of a casual link to justify even a consumer warning.

-from The University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter, April 1993 v9n7p1(2)



_____________



LATEX DEATHS



THE FDA SAYS ONLY 1% OF LATEX DEATHS ARE REPORTED



Delayed contact dermatitis from chemicals in rubber has been recognized since the 1930s.4 But except for rare early reports, clinicians did not appreciate systemic allergic reactions to latex proteins until 1979, when case reports began to appear in Europe. 5



Latex allergy erupted in the United States shortly after the Centers for Disease Control introduced universal precautions in 1987. By late 1992, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) received 1133 reports of serious allergic reactions and anaphylaxis occurring to patients and health care staff associated with 30 classes of latex medical devices. There were 15 patient deaths associated with latex barium enema catheters.5,6



The FDA estimated that the reports represented only 1% of actual occurrences.6



_________



Recent reports in the literature indicate that from about 1 percent to 6 percent of the general population and about 8 percent to 12 percent of regularly exposed health care workers are sensitized to latex.



An estimated 17 million Americans are now sensitive to latex ( up from not one recorded case twenty years ago).



_________



CONDOMS HAVE ALSO BEEN LINKED TO BIRTH DEFECTS, INFIRTILITY (in men), PREECLAMPSIA, AND A HOST OF OTHER SERIOUS CONDITIONS.



Despite the 'politically correct' nonsense the people above have posted the overwhelming evidence is yes, they do.



tential toxicity of retrograde uterine passage of particulate matter.



Wright HR, Wheeler JC, Woods JA, Hesford J, Taylor P, Edlich RF.



Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA.



Dusting powders are commonly used on surgical gloves, examination gloves, and condoms. In addition, they are used in diaphragms, sanitary napkins, and toiletries. These dusting powders can gain access to the abdominal cavity through the vagina or through surgical intervention. The toxicity of these dusting powders in the abdominal cavity can be divided into acute and chronic complications that may be life-threatening. The use of medical and surgical products without dusting powders is strongly recommended.



Publication Types:

Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Review



PMID: 10167361 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query...



* Talc



This is found in baby powders, face powders, body powders as well as some contraceptives such as condoms. Talc is a known carcinogen and is a major cause of ovarian cancer when used in the genital area. It can be harmful if inhaled as it can lodge in the lungs, causing respiratory disorders.



http://www.anewlife.co.uk/toxic-toiletri...





Talc is a very fine substance, so fine it can be used as a "dry" lubricant.



Talc is a chemical similar to asbestos, a known cancer causing substance. Talc is found in many "baby and body" powders, feminine powders and many cosmetics. It's alsp used as a lubricant on condoms! While it makes your skin "feel" slippery smooth, talc does so much more.



How does talc keep babies and your private parts so "fresh"? Presumably by clogging the pores that secrete those necessary fluids. Also, those fine little particles manage to get into the system. And being similar to asbestos is not comforting, especially when used on babies and genital areas.



Talc's harmful effect on human tissues has been known for quite some time. Long ago, its dry lubricating properties were used as a glove-donning powder (easy to slide on) for surgical gloves. As early as the 1930's, talc was linked to post-operative granulomatous peritonitis and fibrous adhesions.



-from Candace Sue Kasper, MD and Dr. P. J. Chandler



Talc...(on condoms)...may result in fallopian tube fibrosis with resultant infertility. Question raised by Doctors Kasper and Chandler in Journal of the American Medical Association. (JAMA) 3/15/95

-from Nutrition Health Review, Summer 1995 n73p8(1)



"A possible tie between talcum powder and ovarian cancer, long suspected because of talc's chemical similarity to asbestos, was strongly supported last week when a study found a higher risk of the cancer among women who used feminine deodorant sprays.



The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that women who used talcum powder in the genital area had an increased ovarian cancer risk of 60% and women who used feminine deodorant sprays had a 90% increased risk."



In 1994, the FDA conducted a scientific workshop on the issue and did not find enough of a casual link to justify even a consumer warning.

-from The University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter, April 1993 v9n7p1(2)



"Aluminum-containing antiperspirants are designed to be absorbed, and studies show that regular use of these products can raise the risk of Alzheimer's by as much as three-fold.



(also)...municipal water supplies treated with alum (aluminum sulfate)...at least 7 studies show that people drinking water high in alum are more likely to develop Alzheimer's"



-from the U.S. News & World Report, March 17, 1997 v122n10p77(1)



ACTUALLY COATING THE OUTER SURFACE



Silicone on Condoms

Silicone is a release agent applied to most condoms to keep the latex from sticking to itself. The coating is light, but measurable by XRF.



http://www.learnxrf.com/appl_pharmec.htm...



Sobering news for rubber contraceptive users.



A German scientific research institute has warned that most condoms on the market contain a cancer-causing chemical and has urged that their manufacture be subjected to stringent quality control.



The Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Institute in Stuttgart said on Friday it had found the carcinogen N-Nitrosamine in 29 of 32 types of condoms it tested in simulated conditions.



The condoms, which were kept in a solution with artificial sweat, exuded huge amounts of cancer-causing N-Nitrosamine from its rubber coating. Researchers measured amounts of N-Nitrosamine, that were way above the prescribed limits for other rubber products such as baby pacifiers.



"N-Nitrosamine is one of the most carcinogenic substances," the study's authors said. "There is a pressing need for manufacturers to tackle this problem."



The study said that the carcinogen is thought to be present in a substance used to improve condom elasticity. When the rubber material comes in contact with human bodily fluids, it can release traces of N-Nitrosamine.



No immediate health risk



But since there are no prescribed limits of N-Nitrosamine for condoms, the study hasn't caused panic among manufacturers or mass-recalling of the products from counters.



Local government officials said condom users should not stop using rubber contraceptives based on the results of the study because N-Nitrosamine does not present an immediate health risk.



The Baden-W├╝rtemmberg Social Ministry said it didn't think "it posed a risk." Authorities are also withholding the name of the affected manufacturers for fear of litigation.



Manufacturers should use alternative substances



But Germany's Federal Institute for Risk Assessment said that daily condom use exposed users to N-Nitrosamine levels up to three times higher than levels naturally present in food.



Werner Altkofer, head of the Stuttgart-based Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Institute said that though the production of rubber usually uses chemicals that can exude N-Nitrosamine, condom manufacturers could bypass it by using more expensive alternative substances available on the market that didn't form the carcinogen.



"We believe that it's up to the manufacturers to use other production processes so that no N-Nitrosamine is formed in condoms," Altkofer said.



He added that the latter was technically possible going by the fact that products of some manufacturers didn't show traces of the carcinogen during the testing.



Beate Uhse taking no chances



Germany's biggest erotica compnay Beate Uhse however, has decided to play it safe.



Shortly after the results of the study were introduced on Friday, the group banned chocolate-flavored condoms from its range. That was because the study had show that condoms laced with a chocolate flavoring had overwhelming high levels of N-Nitrosamine.



Study Says Condoms Contain Cancer-Causing Substance

Reuters ^ | Fri May 28,12:09 PM ET



BERLIN (Reuters) - Most condoms contain a cancer-causing chemical and their manufacture should be subject to greater quality control, a German scientific research institute said Friday.



The Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Institute in Stuttgart, Germany, said it found the carcinogen N-Nitrosamine present in 29 of 32 types of condoms it tested in simulated conditions.



"N-Nitrosamine is one of the most carcinogenic substances," the study's authors said. "There is a pressing need for manufacturers to tackle this problem."



The carcinogen is thought to be present in a substance used to improve condom elasticity. When the rubber material comes in contact with human bodily fluids, it can release traces of N-Nitrosamine, the study said.



Local government officials said condom users should not stop using rubber contraceptives based on results of the study because N-Nitrosamine does not present an immediate health danger.



But Germany's Federal Institute for Risk Assessment said that daily condom use exposed users to N-Nitrosamine levels up to three times higher than levels naturally present in food.



ay 29, 2004



Potent Carcinogen found in Most Condoms



Recent study has discovered the presence of a very potent carcinogen in most condoms. Small amounts of this chemical are released whenever condoms are used.



Nobody knows whether this is serious yet however it is not likely to be healthy to expose the reproductive organs to cancer-causing substances on a regular basis.



This is a potentially serious issue for much of the world's population that cannot afford or access other forms of birth control. I hope further studies will follow on this soon. Could this be related to the rise in cancer in women, and men as well?

May 29, 2004 in Medicine | Permalink



http://novaspivack.typepad.com/nova_spiv...



This article is from the WebMD

Medical News Archive





Analysis Finds Link Between Talc Powders, Ovarian Cancer





By Eric Davis

WebMD Medical News







April 11, 2000 (Atlanta) -- For many women, a dusting of powder helps freshen the vaginal area. But a new study suggests that women should read the labels of so-called "talcum" feminine and bath powders closely. Cornstarch-based products may be better choices.



The study shows that powders can migrate from the vaginal area to the ovaries, and -- if the powder contains talc -- could slightly increase a woman's risk of ovarian cancer.



AND THERE ARE HUNDREDS MORE...

Source(s):

http://groups.msn.com/LIDS-Latexallergiesandthedangersofcondoms
triadkitty
2007-05-24 13:26:33 UTC
I would recommend using a condom or not having sex with them at all. It is more likely for you to contract an STD without a condom. If you use a condom, you have a much greater chance of getting nothing! The choice is really up to you.
lafemelle
2007-05-23 20:47:46 UTC
If you're worried about it, make sure your partner gets tested before you have sex with them. That's the best solution I can think of. Of course the condom always runs the risk of tearing. You have to decide if you want to take that risk...you have to be willing to either trust the condom, or don't have sex with them.
thebulgarian
2007-05-23 21:05:50 UTC
man these days, i cant even have one night stands anymore because of the fear of STDs. But I guess if you arnt sure but are still going to **** em, use KY lubricant, keep it from tearin on u :-)
Brandy
2007-05-25 19:09:08 UTC
Yes I would


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